The End of Ice: Bearing Witness and Finding Meaning in the Path of Climate Disruption

The End of Ice: Bearing Witness and Finding Meaning in the Path of Climate Disruption

The author who Jeremy Scahill calls the “quintessential unembedded reporter” visits “hot spots” around the world in a global quest to discover how we will cope with our planet’s changing ecosystems

After nearly a decade overseas as a war reporter, the acclaimed journalist Dahr Jamail returned to America to renew his passion for mountaineering, only to find that the slopes he had once climbed have been irrevocably changed by climate disruption. In response, Jamail embarks on a journey to the geographical front lines of this crisis—from Alaska to Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, via the Amazon rainforest—in order to discover the consequences to nature and to humans of the loss of ice.



In The End of Ice, we follow Jamail as he scales Denali, the highest peak in North America, dives in the warm crystal waters of the Pacific only to find ghostly coral reefs, and explores the tundra of St. Paul Island where he meets the last subsistence seal hunters of the Bering Sea and witnesses its melting glaciers. Accompanied by climate scientists and people whose families have fished, farmed, and lived in the areas he visits for centuries, Jamail begins to accept the fact that Earth, most likely, is in a hospice situation. Ironically, this allows him to renew his passion for the planet’s wild places, cherishing Earth in a way he has never been able to before.



Like no other book, The End of Ice offers a firsthand chronicle—including photographs throughout of Jamail on his journey across the world—of the catastrophic reality of our situation and the incalculable necessity of relishing this vulnerable, fragile planet while we still can.

Title:The End of Ice: Bearing Witness and Finding Meaning in the Path of Climate Disruption
ISBN:null

    The End of Ice: Bearing Witness and Finding Meaning in the Path of Climate Disruption Reviews

  • Max

    The End of Ice is a really serious book about climate disruption. The author travels around and interviews people who are affected by climate change first hand. The book begins with some personal expe...

  • Steve Donoghue

    There's no way for a book like this - a smart and careful inquiry into the precise mechanics of the climate change apocalypse - can be called uplifting reading, but Dahr Jamail's book is certainly riv...

  • Carolyn McBride

    This is a highly readable, chilling (no pun intended) eye-opening book. Everyone should read this, especially those that refuse to believe that climate change is real. How can anyone deny global warmi...

  • Amit Verma

    This book by a journalist who has worked in Iraq and has deep longing and concern for our nature.Book is enjoyable, pierecing, accurate, detailed and contemporary. Author covers all facets of our ecol...

  • Matt

    This book was, well, depressing. It presents an utterly convincing case that humans are destroying the planet, and that we are negatively affecting pretty much every ecosystem, from the Alaskan tundra...

  • Felice Kelly

    Climate change due to anthropogenic CO2 and methane emissions is changing life on earth, leading to the loss of thousands of species, the loss of ways of life, and the melting of the glaciers. The End...

  • Mark Valentine

    Impossible to read this and not be moved--to tears, to longing, to action.Jamail's best journalism involves his investigations while being embedded in the field. In his first book, Beyond the Green Zo...

  • Ramin

    [ I'm a fan of this new book, as you can tell from my book review in Smithsonian magazine. Here's an excerpt of that piece, and please go here to read the whole thing: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/s...

  • Bart

    Dahr Jamail is the author of three books growing out of his experience as an unembedded journalist in Iraq. But he says what he learned while researching The End Of Ice shook him even more deeply than...

  • Jade

    Though a difficult read (due to the depressing nature of the content), this book proved to feel more like therapy to me. Faced with not just harrowing statistics, but specific and intimate description...